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More 3D-Printing Goodness

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1 More 3D-Printing Goodness on Fri Sep 04, 2015 8:19 am

In light of the brief discussion on the stream yesterday...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8Nvq7aGqoA

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2 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:19 am

Medical advances are always something I'm interested in but I'd just like to say that I'm one of those idiots who when I saw 3D Printing I thought "Man that is stupid, useless, and gimmicky". And then the medical industry came along and proved me completely wrong. Really hopeful this continues to advance and we can get some cost effective solutions for a lot of problems (cost being arguably THE biggest problem facing anyone with serious medical issues in the modern world).


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3 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:07 pm

The Lorerunner wrote:.. I'd just like to say that I'm one of those idiots who when I saw 3D Printing I thought "Man that is stupid, useless, and gimmicky".

I would say that when the technology was in its infancy, that wasn't a truly unreasonable stance to take, considering layman understanding of complex manufacturing and the perception of material integrity; outside of literally seeing the fabrication process for oneself and witnessing all the disparate parts actually functioning in-motion, it's a very difficult thing to make people believe in it.

The Lorerunner wrote:Really hopeful this continues to advance and we can get some cost effective solutions for a lot of problems (cost being arguably THE biggest problem facing anyone with serious medical issues in the modern world).

What I'm assuming we'll eventually see would be the equivalent of industrial-grade specialty fabrication facilities, likely in the medical field first as such a concept in the consumer market would be opulent luxury at best, where-in said facilities are able to truncate costs by specializing in very particular materials, possibly to the point of having the fabrication machines themselves constructed around their use rather than the other way around.

Results in readily accessible fabricators for a limited range of products and an overall cheaper cost (as resources can be safely purchased in bulk since they're guaranteed to see use), with a brand new field of medical advancement dedicated to their operation (think radiologists, etc.) and backed with a bit of tax-payer dollars, and maybe opt-in insurance plans for good measure to help keep things afloat.

Another fascinating thing to consider is the possibility of specialty synthetic pseudo-organic tissue technology for more advanced and invasive prosthesis, such as the spine example we saw yesterday.. hell, maybe even partial or entire internal organs. One can only dare to dream of what the world might see in the next century.

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4 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sat Sep 05, 2015 4:43 am

Hopefully we can see big advances in things like this within the next few years. I can't tell you how much I miss being able to trot down the sidewalk or ride a bike without searing pain, or how much I miss being able to stand up straight without effort.

Here's hoping.

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5 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:11 am

Braigwen wrote:Hopefully we can see big advances in things like this within the next few years. I can't tell you how much I miss being able to trot down the sidewalk or ride a bike without searing pain, or how much I miss being able to stand up straight without effort.

Here's hoping.

I'm thinking the exact same thing. I've recently (within the last two years) developed a lot of lower back pain, no doubt due to both my scoliosis and, as a result of that, my poor posture. I'd pay some serious cash in order to feel as if I wasn't just stabbed whenever I wake up or walk around for any significant length of time.

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6 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sat Sep 05, 2015 1:24 pm

One of my Aunts had reconstructive surgery on her spine... I guess 2 years ago now. Her discs were bad, no need to go into details, but they basically replaced a chunk of her spine with this contraption to help it stay functional and no longer crush or injure the material in there. Two perspectives on this; first, from her perspective, she said it was like night and day going from before to after. Her pain went from barely tolerating while on a daily hydrocodone script to no pain at all, even when doing things like walking around, or jogging, or actual physical activity. And the other perspective is; my own. I ended up seeing here barely a month after the surgery and the difference was substantial. She had more energy, she was more lively, she was happier, she'd lost a lot of weight because she could function again, it was just completely different.

I relate this entire story because my Aunt has a lot of money and could afford the gabrillion dollars for that surgery. How amazing would it be for this technology to be pushed to the point where people with normal lives and jobs like, well, us could afford that kind of thing? To be able to take, say, a bad hip or a bad spine or otherwise damaged tissue, bone, or organs and replace them with functional ones?


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7 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sat Sep 05, 2015 2:43 pm

The Lorerunner wrote:How amazing would it be for this technology to be pushed to the point where people with normal lives and jobs like, well, us could afford that kind of thing?  To be able to take, say, a bad hip or a bad spine or otherwise damaged tissue, bone, or organs and replace them with functional ones?  

Interesting topic for a good philosphical debate, or a game as Deus Ex: HR proved it. However the bottom line with those sorts of arguments is always where the do not cross line is.

On Topic, 3-D printing is an amazing thing because of how revolutionary it is. I heard it argued that 3-D printing can be the next big advancements in manufacturing. Think agrarian society to industrial to 3-d printed one(?). It is possible to print from any material if you can convert it into a neccessary form. The potential is ground breaking, buying a 3-d printer and a paste(whatever it uses as the building blocks) and you can already make phone cases etc etc. Few more years or decades 3-d printing can be a home factory which could produce anything we will wish, the propsects do sound amazing - lost your keys? not a problem, here is another set. Need an extra box to store your stuff, here are two. etc etc

Yet as always such big step, while lowering the marginal costs of production and with a potential to turn everyone everyone into a prosumer(producer/consumer) have a huge amount of negative drawback for the workers especially in poor countries.

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8 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sat Sep 05, 2015 4:41 pm

In response to Omega, there are absolutely possible negatives towards this big of a technological jump forward, including 'unforeseen ones' aka the kinds of things we can't predict because it's a new way of thinking. But this has also been called the first real step towards replication technology, and it's a hard point to argue. We're still in a finite resources situation, but who knows how this could and indeed will be applied 10 years from now?


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9 Re: More 3D-Printing Goodness on Sun Sep 06, 2015 5:09 am

As I said the prospects are amazing. With every year something what seemed sci fi yesterday becomes a mundane part of reality today. Still waiting for those hover boards though...

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"For the first time, a patient has received a custom, 3D-printed titanium implant to replace part of his rib cage."

"Once printed, finished and polished, the implant was couriered to the Salamanca University Hospital, where it was implanted into the patient's chest. It has now been two weeks since the surgery, and the patient has been discharged (and) is recovering well." - Michelle Starr, CNET

I have yet to come across a price point for either the fabrication of the prosthesis, or the operation itself.

CSIRO-sponsored video regarding the fabricated prosthesis.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=2&v=Xt0CiUDVPHk

CNET article covering procedure.
http://www.cnet.com/news/cancer-patient-receives-3d-printed-sternum-ribs/

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